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miércoles, 15 de enero de 2014

El movimiento en la aparente quietud delata el paso del tiempo (o viceversa): Ryuta Iida y Nerhol (Yoshihisa Tanaka)



Si Romain Laurent nos mostraba las posibilidades expresivas del movimiento en fragmentos de sus fotografías estáticas, Ryuta Iida y Nerhol (Yoshihisa Tanaka) realizan una curiosa deconstrucción del concepto de time-lapse a través de series fotográficas de retratos estáticos separados por lapsos de minutos en el tiempo y cuyos fragmentos recompuestos nos muestran las pequeñas variaciones que se producen en la aparente quietud de la posición del modelo retratado.

Una vez más, este interesante trabajo nos lo descubre COLOSSAL y podéis verlo en su entrada original clicando en el título del fragmento que reproducimos a continuación:

Time-lapse Portraits Layered and Cut to Reveal the Passage of Time

Time lapse Portraits Layered and Cut to Reveal the Passage of Time portraits paper
Time lapse Portraits Layered and Cut to Reveal the Passage of Time portraits paper
Time lapse Portraits Layered and Cut to Reveal the Passage of Time portraits paper
Time lapse Portraits Layered and Cut to Reveal the Passage of Time portraits paper
For over a year I’ve been stalking the website of book and paper artist Ryuta Iida hoping to share new work with you and today I finally have something to show for it. As part of an ongoing collaboration with artist Yoshihisa Tanaka called Nerhol the duo are showing 27 new works at limArt this month including these astounding new portraits that are part of a series called Misunderstanding Focus. At first glance it looks as though a photograph has been printed numerous times, layered and cut into a sort of sculptural topography, which would indeed be amazing enough, but Nerhol took things a bit further. The numerous portraits are actually different, photographed over a period of three minutes as the subject tried to sit motionless, the idea being that it’s impossible to ever truly be still as our center of gravity shifts and our muscles are tense. The portraits are actually a layered lime-lapse representing several minutes in the subjects life and then cut like an onion to show slices of time, similar to the trunk of a tree. What a brilliant idea. If you’ve never seen Iida’s cut paper books, definitely head over to Nerhol to see them up close. A huge thanks to my friend Johnny at Spoon & Tamago for helping me translate some of this! (via upon a fold)